Distance-based Drills

These are so fun!

Research has shown our bodies adapt to a workout the second time we do it. So make the most of your time and add some variety! Never do the same workout twice in one week, or one month for that matter! The possibilities are endless. Be creative! For new workouts ideas, check back often for updates! Enjoy!

 

Guidelines: For each option, do a 5-10 minute warm-up and cool down at a slow to medium pace. The average total length of your workout should be about 30-45 minutes. Repeat the intervals as needed to make your time goal. If using a treadmill, be sure to set the incline at 1.0-2.0 to make it more comparable to an outdoor run, accounting for some wind resistance and road incline variation.

 

1. Alternating fast and slow– Pick any distance, run it at a faster pace then run it at a slower pace to recover. Repeat for desired time. For example, one of my favorites is the quarter-mile repeat. My 10K goal pace is 7:20, so I run my fast pace at a 7:00 minute mile then recover at a 7:45 pace. I repeat this for 6 miles.

 

2. 5K Pick-up: Sprint a 1/4 mile, walk 1/8 mile. Repeat for 3.5 miles. This is great for increasing you 5K race pace.

 

3.  Distance Countdown: 1 mile run, 1/4 mile jog, 3/4 mile run, 1/4 mile jog, 1/2 mile run, 1/4 mile jog, 1/4 mile run, 1/4 mile jog. Repeat. Each ‘run’ should be a bit faster than the previous, since each ‘run’ is a bit shorter.

 

*Elliptical, bike, stair master, or incline walking can be substituted for running.

RUN = Sprint pace

JOG = medium pace

WALK = slow recovery pace

 

Incline-based Drills

Incline or hill workouts are a great way to prepare yourself for running outdoors, target different muscles than flat running (specifically gluts and hamstrings), and burn more calories.

 

Guidelines: For each option, do a 5-10 minute warm-up and cool down at a slow to medium pace. The average total length of your workout should be about 30-45 minutes. Repeat the intervals as needed to make your time goal. Focus on form as your incline gets higher. Drive your elbows back and bend the elbows slightly more than flat running.

 

1. Jumping Around – 4 x 5-minute hill repeats. Perform a 2-minute easy jog at 2.0 incline for recovery between each incline ‘set.’

Set 1: 5 minutes at 4 percent incline;

Set 2: 5 minutes at 5 percent incline;

Set 3: 5 minutes at 6 percent incline;

Set 4: 5 minutes at 7 percent incline;

 

2. Long Hills – 2 x 20-minutes at 5 percent incline. Keep the speed moderate. The idea is to stay aerobic, keep the heart rate low and work on your uphill running technique. After the first interval, recover for two to three minutes with 1.0 incline, then start the second interval.

 

3. Climb the Mountain – Each minute increase your incline by 0.5 until you are halfway through your workout, then begin to decrease your incline by 0.5 until you are finished. Be sure to pick a pace you can keep at a high incline!

 

Simple Time-based Drills

Simple yes. Easy…no.

I especially love intervals in the winter because all my workouts move indoors. Intervals seem to make time go faster because keeping track of what interval I am on, how many I have left, how much longer I have for this specific interval, etc., etc., distracts my mind from the dullness of the dreaded treadmill workout.

Keep changing it up! Your mind and your body will thank you!

Our bodies are very efficient! Studies show that the body adapts to a workout after just the second time you do it, and you will therefore burn less calories/ burn less fat. So keep your body guessing! Never do the same workout twice!

Guidelines: For each option, do a 5-10 minute warm-up and cool down at a slow to medium pace. The average total length of your workout should be about 30-45 minutes. Repeat the intervals as needed to make your time goal. On a treadmill, be sure to set the incline at 1.0-2.0 to make it more comparable to an outdoor run, accounting for some wind resistance and road incline variation.

1. Pick-a-ratio. I love this because the possibilities are endless! Simply pick a time ratio, 1 to 2, 3 to 2, whatever! and repeat until you reach your goal time. Even the same ratio can be altered to give you more variety. So for a 2:1 ratio, the first session you could do 30 seconds hard to 15 seconds recover and the second session do 4 minutes hard to 2 minutes recover. There you have two completely different workouts based on the same ratio. Simple yet effective.

Here are some other examples…

1:1 Ratio – 2 minutes hard, 2 minutes easy; 1 minute hard, 1 minute easy; etc.

1:2 Ratio – 1 minute sprint, 2 minutes recover pace; 2 minutes hard run, 4 minute recovery pace; etc.

1:3 Ratio – 15 second all out sprint, 45 second recovery walk

2:1 Ratio – 4 minutes 5K pace, 2 minutes recovery jog

3:1 Ratio – 6 minutes 10K race pace, 2 minutes recovery jog

 

2. Count down – You would think that as the time gets shorter the interval gets easier. Not so, because as the time gets shorter your pace gets faster. Based on the amount of total run time you have, start with more or less than 5 minutes. You may also alter your recover time.

Run hard 5 minutes, jog 4 minutes, run hard 4 minutes, jog 3 minutes, run hard 3 minutes, jog 2 minutes, run hard 2 minutes, jog 1 minute, run hard 1 minute. Each ‘run’ should be a bit faster than the previous, since each ‘run’ is a bit shorter.

 

3. Increasing Speed Repeats –  On a treadmill, increase your speed by 0.1 every minute for 10 minutes, then return back to your beginning speed and repeat the interval as needed.

 

4. The Speed Mountain – On a treadmill, increase your speed by 0.2 every minute for 5 minutes then decrease the speed by 0.2 every minute for 5 minutes. Repeat as needed.

 

*For all intervals, elliptical, bike, stair master, or incline walking can be substituted for running.

RUN = Fast pace

JOG = medium pace

WALK = slow recovery pace

If you need more information about any of these intervals or would like help figuring out a pace or which intervals would be good for your fitness level, hire me! Contact me at LauraTarbell@gmail.com.